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End of Season 2 - Summer Break

Ivan Shishkin - Рожь - Google Art Project

If you missed it in last Monday's episode, I mentioned Episode 30 was the last installment of Season 2.  I've also decided to take the rest of August off, as well as the whole of September, before coming back for Season 3 in October.

This break gives me a chance to make improvements to the podcast, diversify my reading, and work on other projects such as writing.  It also happens to be a good time personally, since I'm going through some sudden changes at work which will need more of my attention (and energy).

In the meantime, be sure to catch up on older episodes, suggest new books or topics, and follow me on Instagram (@classicsconsidered).  There is a lot of new content coming to this site as well, so watch for more updates in the coming weeks!

Finding 'A Room of One's Own' - Episode 30

In A Room of One's Own, Virginia Woolf takes us through a history of women in fiction, from the unknown poets of Elizabethan times to 18th and 19th-century writers like Jane Austen and Charlotte Brontë.  This little book is not only for feminists, but for anyone interested in the life and classic writings of female authors.

Apologies for the intermittent background noise, near the beginning of the episode.  It was probably me leaning on my "lectern" - i.e. a white cabinet on wheels, which may not be the most stable setup...  I'll be taking extra precautions in the future!

Sources / Further Reading:
"Virginia Woolf Was More Than Just a Women’s Writer" - Humanities magazine
Virginia Woolf's suicide note (Wikisource)
Napoleonic Code (Encyclopedia Britannica)

Reading and Podcasting: Behind the Scenes - Episode 29

How did I first get into classic literature, let alone podcast about it? This week's episode features a glimpse into my reading life and podcasting journey, as well as some tips and technology which have helped me along the way.

Opening quote is from South by Sir Ernest Shackleton.  It has no bearing on today's topic; it's just a nice quote on a topic that's been on my brain.
 
Links:
Classics Considered on Instagram - Follow to get sneak peeks of future episodes!
Noonlight Reads - My all-purpose reading blog.  Links to my stories can be found here.
RSS Owl - A free, open-source RSS / blog reader
Lithium (app) - Useful for reading Project Gutenberg ebooks on an Android tablet
OneNote Online

First Impressions - Flannery O'Connor - Episode 28

This summer, I've been getting to know Southern Gothic author Flannery O'Connor through a collection of her short stories. In this "First Impressions" episode, I chat about her life, her writing, and the themes in her stories which grabbed my attention.

Sources / Further Reading:
"This Lonesome Place: Flannery O’Connor on race and religion in the unreconstructed South." - The New Yorker article
Flannery O'Connor biography - New Georgia Encyclopedia
The Presence of Grace and Other Book Reviews by Flannery O'Connor (Google Books page)

My Sherlock Holmes Obsession - Episode 27


Today I take a nostalgia trip back to the time I first met Sherlock Holmes. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's legendary detective has impacted my life in many ways, from violin playing to overcoming social anxiety. I also share my thoughts on a number of adaptations, including the Jeremy Brett TV series and Benedict Cumberbatch's Sherlock.

Links:
Opening quote read by David Clarke (LibriVox)
Opening music - "Ambush in Rattlesnake Gulch" by Brian Boyko (Public domain, FreePD.com)

Vice, Virtue, and Heroism in Eugene Onegin - Episode 26


For lovers of Pride and Prejudice and Jane Eyre, Eugene Onegin takes us back to Imperial Russia, where young Tatyana Larina falls for her brooding, Byronic neighbor. More than a romance, Alexander Pushkin's epic poem is a classic of Russian literature and history, as well as a glimpse into the 19th-century dueling culture which proved to be so fatal for him.

Sources / Further Reading:
Why the Russian aristocrats spoke French - Reddit discussion with academic sources
Eugene Onegin - Translation by Henry Spalding (not my first recommendation, but it's free)
Pushkin's African Background - Article by the British Library
List of Alexander Pushkin's duels - By blogger Rina Tim
Russian Ark (2002) - A creative documentary surveying 200 years of Russian culture.  I was able to watch this on loan from the library, and while it's a slow film (not gripping), the visuals are interesting.
Opening quote read by MaryAnn (LibriVox)

Emily Dickinson - Life of a Poet - Episode 25

She left us with over 1,000 poems, full of vibrant imagery and even more mysteries.  Join me as I search for the real Emily Dickinson behind the legend, examining her life story and reading such gems as "I died for beauty" and "A bird came down the walk."

Sources / Further Reading:
Selected Poems & Letters of Emily Dickinson - Edited by Robert Linscott
Emily Dickinson - Biography at Poets.org
The Emily Dickinson Museum